Duo Arrested for Impersonating Public Servant

The Police have arrested two men, aged 17 and 18, for their suspected involvement in several cases of impersonating a public servant.

On 6 April 2017, the Police received a report of a group of young men claiming to be Police officers and engaging in aggressive tactics to seek donations in public.

Through extensive follow-ups, officers from Ang Mo Kio Division established the identities of the group and two suspects were arrested on 9 April 2017. The Police are also investigating against the licensee for possible breach of regulations under the House to House and Street Collections Act.

Police investigations are ongoing. Anyone found guilty of an offence of Impersonating a Public Servant, under Section 170 of the Penal Code, Chapter 224, may be punished with an imprisonment term which may extend to 2 years, and shall also be liable to fine.

The Police would like to remind the public to be vigilant and wary of persons who may impersonate as Police Officers to facilitate the commission of their criminal acts. If in doubt, they should request for the Police Officer’s Warrant Card to verify his identity before complying with the instructions of the officer. A genuine warrant card will have identification features such as the Police crest, the photo of the officer, his name and NRIC number. When the card is tilted at an angle, the holographic word “POLICE” will also appear below the Officer’s photograph. If they are still unsure of the person’s credibility as a Police Officer, they should call 999 for assistance. More information on how to identify and verify the authenticity of a Police Officer is available at https://www.facebook.com/singaporepoliceforce/posts/10154694598379408.

Source: Singapore Police Force

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