Daily Archives: February 8, 2020

Radient Technologies Inc. Announces Changes to its Board of Directors

EDMONTON, Alberta, Feb. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Radient Technologies Inc. (“Radient” or the “Company”) (TSX Venture: RTI; OTCQX: RDDTF), a global commercial manufacturer of high quality cannabinoid-based ingredients, formulations and products, announces the following changes to its Board of Directors, effective today.

Addition of two Board Members:

Radient is pleased to announce that Health Canada has approved the addition of Ms. Jocelyne F. Lafrenière and Mr. Yves Gougoux to its Board of Directors, effective today. Radient initially announced the appointment of Ms. Lafrenière and Mr. Gougoux to its Board in a press release dated April 17, 2019.

Denis Taschuk, President & CEO of Radient, commented, “We are very pleased to welcome these two very accomplished individuals to our Board of Directors. Both Ms. Lafrenière and Mr. Gougoux have achieved incredible success throughout their careers, and we know that their innovation, passion, and leadership will be a credit to Radient as we continue to grow.”

Ms. Jocelyne F. Lafrenière, CPA, CA, CICA, CPSC, Adm.A:

Ms. Lafrenière is the President & Chief Executive Officer of JFL International Inc., a management consulting firm. She is a retired partner of KPMG where she led the Compliance, Infrastructure Advisory and International Development Assistance Services of their Ottawa office. With more than 35 years of audit and consulting experience, she has served as an advisor to a broad spectrum of public and private companies, non-profit organizations, government departments and agencies, crown corporations and United Nations agencies.

Throughout her career, she has actively championed for the empowerment of women and the protection of children, as well as supporting education. She is the author of 12 business management courses and two self-empowerment books, and has served as a Director on several Boards. Ms. Lafrenière is also a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal for her significant contribution to the community in Canada and abroad.

Mr. Yves Gougoux:

Mr. Gougoux has spent more than 40 years in the field of advertising and marketing. After presiding over several national advertising agencies in Canada, in 1984 Mr. Gougoux acquired BCP, the first French Canadian advertising agency in Montreal. In 1996 BCP entered into a partnership with international advertising agency Publicis Groupe, resulting in the launch of Publicis in Canada, with locations in Toronto and Montreal. Mr. Gougoux was made CEO of Publicis Canada and under his guidance the agency proceeded with acquisitions in Toronto and Montreal, quickly becoming one of the leading advertising agencies in Canada. In 1998 Mr. Gougoux moved to Paris to preside over Publicis Conseil, the Paris office of Publicis, while remaining the CEO for Publicis Canada. After moving back to Canada in 2000, he sold his 30% stake of Publicis Canada to Publicis Groupe in 2013, and became Chairman of the Board of Publicis Canada in 2015. He currently serves as non-executive Chairman.

Mr. Gougoux is also on the Board of Directors of the Mira Foundation, a non-profit organization that trains and supplies service dogs to blind and handicapped persons as well as children with autism. He completed his business studies at Concordia University in Montréal.

Resignation of two Board Members:

Radient announces today the resignation of Mr. Steve Dauphin from the Company’s Board of Directors, for personal reasons. Francesco Ferlaino, Radient’s Chairman of the Board, commented, “I would like to thank Steve on behalf of Radient for his significant contributions during his six-year tenure on the Board. His guidance, ongoing support and commitment to the development of the Company will be greatly missed.”

Mr. Dimitris Tzanis will also today be resigning from Radient’s Board of Directors, in order to pursue other interests. “Mr. Tzanis has been a Director of Radient since 2016, and has been a strong supporter of the Company during that time. On behalf of Radient I would like to thank him for his contributions to the Company’s success, and wish him well in his future endeavours,” said Mr. Ferlaino.

About Radient
Radient Technologies is a commercial manufacturer of high quality cannabinoid based formulations, ingredients and products. Utilizing a proprietary extraction and downstream processing platform that recovers up to 99% of cannabinoids from the cannabis plant, Radient develops specialty products and ingredients that contain a broad range of cannabinoid and terpene profiles while meeting the highest standards of quality and safety. Please visit www.radientinc.com for more information.

SOURCE: Radient Technologies Inc.

Contact: Caitlin Cheadle, Director of Communications: ccheadle@radientinc.com

Forward Looking Information:
This press release contains “forward-looking information” within the meaning of applicable Canadian securities legislation. Forward-looking information includes, without limitation, statements regarding the growth of the Company’s business operations; the impact of changes to the Company’s board of directors; the Company’s ability to grow its business in the cannabis sector and the Company’s future plans. Generally, forward-looking information can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “plans”, “expects” or “does not expect”, “is expected”, “budget”, “scheduled”, “estimates”, “forecasts”, “intends”, “anticipates” or “does not anticipate”, or “believes”, or variations of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results “may”, “could”, “would”, “might” or “will be taken”, “occur” or “be achieved”. Forward-looking information is subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause the actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements of Radient, as the case may be, to be materially different from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking information. Although Radient has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate, as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Accordingly, readers should not place undue reliance on forward-looking information. Radient does not undertake to update any forward-looking information, except in accordance with applicable securities laws.

NEITHER THE TSX VENTURE EXCHANGE NOR ITS REGULATION SERVICES PROVIDER (AS THAT TERM IS DEFINED IN THE POLICIES OF THE TSX VENTURE EXCHANGE) ACCEPTS RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ADEQUACY OR ACCURACY OF THIS RELEASE.

Sundance Energy Inc. Announces Participation in February Investor Conferences

DENVER, Feb. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Sundance Energy Inc. (NASDAQ: SNDE) (“Sundance” or the “Company”) today announced management’s participation in several upcoming conferences during the month of February.

Eric P. McCrady, Chief Executive Officer, is scheduled to present at the Enercom Dallas 2020 conference in Dallas, TX on Tuesday, February 11th, 2020 at 1:55 PM CST followed by a breakout question and answer session. A livestream of Mr. McCrady’s presentation will be available on the Enercom website at https://www.enercomdallas.com/company-pages/sundance-energy/.

Mr. McCrady is also scheduled to present at Noble Capital Markets’ 16th Annual Investor Conference in Hollywood, FL on Tuesday, February 18th, 2020 at 2:00 PM EST, followed by a breakout question and answer session. A webcast of the presentation will be made available at www.nobleconference.com and www.channelchek.com for 90 days following the event.

About Sundance Energy Inc.

Sundance Energy Inc. is an independent energy exploration company located in Denver, Colorado. The Company is focused on the acquisition and development of large, repeatable oil and natural gas resource plays in North America. Current activities are focused in the Eagle Ford. A comprehensive overview of the Company can be found on Sundance’s website at www.sundanceenergy.net

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This press release contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are identified by the use of the words “project,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “contemplate,” “foresee,” “would,” “could,” “plan,” and similar expressions that are intended to identify forward-looking statements, which are generally not historical in nature. These forward-looking statements are based on management’s current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effect on Sundance. While management believes that these forward-looking statements are reasonable as and when made, there can be no assurance that future developments affecting Sundance will be those that are anticipated. Sundance’s forward-looking statements involve significant risks and uncertainties (some of which are beyond Sundance’s control) and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from Sundance’s historical experience and present expectations or projections. These include, but are not limited to, risks or uncertainties associated with our previously completed redomiciliation (including the ability to recognize any benefits therefrom), the discovery and development of oil and natural gas reserves, cash flows and liquidity, business and financial strategy, budget, projections and operating results, oil and natural gas prices, amount, nature and timing of capital expenditures, including future development costs, availability and terms of capital and general economic and business conditions. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements contained in this press release, which speak only as of the date of this press release. Forward-looking statements also are affected by the risk factors described in Sundance’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, as may be amended, and those set forth from time-to-time in other filings with the SEC. Sundance undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements after the date they are made, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

For more information, please contact:

John Roberts
VP Finance & Investor Relations
Tel: (720) 638-2400
Eric McCrady
Chief Executive Officer
Tel: (303) 543-5703

Thailand Touted for Rare Move to Drop Chinese Plan for Mekong River

YANGON, MYANMAR – Rights groups and researchers have welcomed Thailand’s decision to cancel a Beijing-backed project to dredge and blow open a shallow and rocky stretch of the Mekong River along the Thai-Lao border.

The move is a rare victory for groups and communities fighting to save Southeast Asia’s most important river from overdevelopment.

Beijing’s plan � endorsed by Laos, Myanmar and Thailand in 2000 � was to make the stretch of rapids navigable for larger cargo ships hoping to ply the Mekong between China’s landlocked Yunnan province and the busy trade routes of the South China Sea. Rights groups and local communities feared it would destroy critical fish habitat and their way of life.

Thai government spokeswoman Trisulee Trisaranakul said the cabinet scrapped the plan Tuesday.

“The reasons is …China does not support the project anymore and it affects the people of Thailand, because Thai people do not want to make it happen,” she told VOA.

Pianporn Deetes, Thailand campaign director for International Rivers, which advocates for sustainable riverine management, called it “a momentous win for the Mekong.”

Were the project to move forward, it “would transform the river from a life-giving watershed [in] to an industrial corridor where transnational corporations profit at a staggering cost to local livelihoods and biodiversity, rivaled only by the Amazon,” she said in a statement.

“But this week’s decision by the Thai cabinet serves as a disruption to the reckless rush to transform and capitalize on the rich resources of the Mekong River. It provides some hope that another future is still possible � one that fully accounts for the Mekong’s vital ecological, social and cultural values.”

Critics of the project say the rapids are a breeding ground of the critically endangered, and aptly named, Mekong giant catfish, which can grow up to 3 meters in length and weigh in at 300 kilograms. They also are worried that transforming the scenic waterway into a busy shipping lane would kill off the tourism that helps sustain many communities along its banks.

Pianporn gives much of the credit for the Thai government’s about face to a pair of grassroots campaign collectives � the Chiang Khong Conservation Group and the Thai Mekong People’s Network � for putting up a stiff and sustained fight with both the Thai government and project developer the China Communications Construction Company.

Chiang Khong’s Niwat Roykaew said many locals at first doubted the use of taking on such formidable foes, according to the International Rivers statement.

But this proves that we can do it, with evidence-based campaigns. At last this project is officially canceled,” he said.

Although China had quietly backed away from the project about a year ago, cutting off funding for further feasibility studies, the Thai cabinet’s decision Tuesday was the “final nail in the coffin,” Brian Eyler, a senior fellow at the Washington-based Stimson Center, who heads the research group’s Mekong Policy Project, told VOA.

“The local community activists in northern Thailand should be commended for their tenacity and tirelessness. Wins like this don’t often happen in the Mekong,” he said.

But Eyler said the activists also were lucky their concerns dovetailed with those of the Thai military, ever wary of China’s regular armed patrols of the Mekong well past its own border.

“In this instance Thailand’s justifiable security concerns lined up with the very justifiable concerns of well-organized community groups, and the project was canceled � regardless of what others in Thailand thought toward the benefits of more commerce on the Mekong,” he said.

Thailand’s reverse course on a Beijing-backed project is rare. But China’s ever-expanding infrastructure push across the region has been hitting resistance or running aground elsewhere as well.

Since Malaysia’s voters booted a coterie of corruption-mired leaders from office in mid-2018, the new government has scaled back the size and cost of Beijing-backed projects for a port and railway that threatened to drown a country already swimming in debt. In Myanmar, China’s bid to build the Myitsone hydropower dam has met strong resistance from locals and has been on hold since the country’s military government embarked on democratic reforms in 2011.

“In countries where local people impacted negatively by these projects can take action to voice concerns and push for a better deal or a postponement or cancellation, we do see Chinese companies responding by increasing standards or transparency or foregoing projects,” Eyler said. “This, however, is not happening in countries like Laos or Cambodia where civil society and impacted stakeholders rarely have a voice.”

China already has straddled its stretch of the river with 11 hydropower dams, while Laos and Cambodia are either operating, building or planning at least as many more with funding from China, Thailand and Vietnam. Researchers have warned of the river’s ecological collapse if they all get built.

Source: Voice of America

Thailand Touted for Rare Move to Drop Chinese Plan for Mekong River

YANGON, MYANMAR – Rights groups and researchers have welcomed Thailand’s decision to cancel a Beijing-backed project to dredge and blow open a shallow and rocky stretch of the Mekong River along the Thai-Lao border.

The move is a rare victory for groups and communities fighting to save Southeast Asia’s most important river from overdevelopment.

Beijing’s plan � endorsed by Laos, Myanmar and Thailand in 2000 � was to make the stretch of rapids navigable for larger cargo ships hoping to ply the Mekong between China’s landlocked Yunnan province and the busy trade routes of the South China Sea. Rights groups and local communities feared it would destroy critical fish habitat and their way of life.

Thai government spokeswoman Trisulee Trisaranakul said the cabinet scrapped the plan Tuesday.

“The reasons is …China does not support the project anymore and it affects the people of Thailand, because Thai people do not want to make it happen,” she told VOA.

Pianporn Deetes, Thailand campaign director for International Rivers, which advocates for sustainable riverine management, called it “a momentous win for the Mekong.”

Were the project to move forward, it “would transform the river from a life-giving watershed [in] to an industrial corridor where transnational corporations profit at a staggering cost to local livelihoods and biodiversity, rivaled only by the Amazon,” she said in a statement.

“But this week’s decision by the Thai cabinet serves as a disruption to the reckless rush to transform and capitalize on the rich resources of the Mekong River. It provides some hope that another future is still possible � one that fully accounts for the Mekong’s vital ecological, social and cultural values.”

Critics of the project say the rapids are a breeding ground of the critically endangered, and aptly named, Mekong giant catfish, which can grow up to 3 meters in length and weigh in at 300 kilograms. They also are worried that transforming the scenic waterway into a busy shipping lane would kill off the tourism that helps sustain many communities along its banks.

Pianporn gives much of the credit for the Thai government’s about face to a pair of grassroots campaign collectives � the Chiang Khong Conservation Group and the Thai Mekong People’s Network � for putting up a stiff and sustained fight with both the Thai government and project developer the China Communications Construction Company.

Chiang Khong’s Niwat Roykaew said many locals at first doubted the use of taking on such formidable foes, according to the International Rivers statement.

But this proves that we can do it, with evidence-based campaigns. At last this project is officially canceled,” he said.

Although China had quietly backed away from the project about a year ago, cutting off funding for further feasibility studies, the Thai cabinet’s decision Tuesday was the “final nail in the coffin,” Brian Eyler, a senior fellow at the Washington-based Stimson Center, who heads the research group’s Mekong Policy Project, told VOA.

“The local community activists in northern Thailand should be commended for their tenacity and tirelessness. Wins like this don’t often happen in the Mekong,” he said.

But Eyler said the activists also were lucky their concerns dovetailed with those of the Thai military, ever wary of China’s regular armed patrols of the Mekong well past its own border.

“In this instance Thailand’s justifiable security concerns lined up with the very justifiable concerns of well-organized community groups, and the project was canceled � regardless of what others in Thailand thought toward the benefits of more commerce on the Mekong,” he said.

Thailand’s reverse course on a Beijing-backed project is rare. But China’s ever-expanding infrastructure push across the region has been hitting resistance or running aground elsewhere as well.

Since Malaysia’s voters booted a coterie of corruption-mired leaders from office in mid-2018, the new government has scaled back the size and cost of Beijing-backed projects for a port and railway that threatened to drown a country already swimming in debt. In Myanmar, China’s bid to build the Myitsone hydropower dam has met strong resistance from locals and has been on hold since the country’s military government embarked on democratic reforms in 2011.

“In countries where local people impacted negatively by these projects can take action to voice concerns and push for a better deal or a postponement or cancellation, we do see Chinese companies responding by increasing standards or transparency or foregoing projects,” Eyler said. “This, however, is not happening in countries like Laos or Cambodia where civil society and impacted stakeholders rarely have a voice.”

China already has straddled its stretch of the river with 11 hydropower dams, while Laos and Cambodia are either operating, building or planning at least as many more with funding from China, Thailand and Vietnam. Researchers have warned of the river’s ecological collapse if they all get built.

Source: Voice of America

Thai Gunman Shot Dead in Mall; 26 Killed, 57 Hurt in Rampage

NAKHON RATCHASIMA, THAILAND – A soldier with a grudge gunned down 26 people and wounded 57 in Thailand’s worst shooting spree before he was fatally shot inside a mall in the country’s northeast Sunday, officials said.

Officials said the soldier was angry over a financial dispute, first killing two people on a military base and then went on a far bloodier rampage Saturday, shooting as he drove to the mall where shoppers fled in terror.

It took police sharpshooters 16 hours to end the crisis.

Authorities said Sgt. Maj. Jakrapanth Thomma was behind the attack in Nakhon Ratchasima, a hub for Thailand’s relatively poorer and rural northeastern region. Much of the shooting took place at Terminal 21 Korat, an airport-themed mall filled with colorful Lego sculptures, a merry-go-round and huge replicas of landmarks from around the world.

This incident was unprecedented in Thailand, Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha told reporters as he gave the final tally Sunday morning after visiting the wounded in hospitals.

I hope this is the only one and the last incident, and that it never happens again. No one wants this to happen. It could be because of this person’s mental health in this particular moment, he said.

Prayuth said he was worried that people inside the mall could be accidentally hit by bullets fired by police, but added, I have checked, that didn’t happen.

Video taken outside the mall showed people diving for cover as shots rang out midafternoon Saturday. Many were killed outside the mall, some in cars, others while walking.

People flee in terror

Nattaya Nganiem and her family had just finished eating and were driving away when she heard gunfire.

“First I saw a woman run out from the mall hysterically,” said Nattaya, who shot video of the scene on her phone. “Then a motorcycle rider in front of her just ran and left his motorcycle there.”

Hundreds of people were evacuated from the mall in small batches by police while they searched for the gunman.

“We were scared and ran to hide in toilets,” said Sumana Jeerawattanasuk, one of those rescued by police. She said seven or eight people hid in the same room as her.

“I am so glad. I was so scared of getting hurt,” she said.

Shortly before midnight, police announced they had secured the above-ground portion of the mall, but were still searching for the shooter. About 16 hours later, officials held a news conference outside the mall to announce the gunman was fatally shot.

The officials did not release any details.

First victim: commanding officer

Defense Ministry spokesman Kongcheep told Thai media that the first person killed was the commanding officer of the 22nd Ammunition Battalion, in which the suspect also served. He said the gunman had fired at others at his base and took guns and ammunition before fleeing in an army Humvee.

City and neighborhood police officers, who asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to release information, said the man fired shots as he drove to the mall. Thai Rath television aired mall security camera footage showing a man with what appeared to be an assault rifle.

The man also posted updates to his Facebook page during the rampage.

“No one can escape death,” read one post. Another asked, “Should I give up?” In a later post, he wrote, “I have stopped already.”

A photo circulated on social media that appeared to be taken from the Facebook page shows a man wearing a green camouflaged military helmet while a fireball and black smoke rage behind him. Jakrapanth’s profile picture shows him in a mask and dressed in military-style fatigues and armed with a pistol. The background image is of a handgun and bullets. The Facebook page was made inaccessible after the shooting began.

Airport-theme mall

Mall Terminal 21 Korat, a multilevel glass and steel mall is designed to resemble an airport terminal, complete with a mock control tower and departure gates. A large model passenger jet dangles from wires beside one of the main escalators.

Each of its seven retail floors is decorated to represent a different country. A giant replica of Paris’ Eiffel Tower soars to the ceiling, while a model of London’s Big Ben dominates another area, and a massive model of California’s Golden Gate Bridge spans an open courtyard. A two-story golden Oscar statue towers over a food court.

Many malls in Thailand, including Terminal 21’s namesake in Bangkok, have metal detectors and security cameras at entrances manned by uniformed but unarmed security guards. Checks on those entering are often cursory at best.

Mass shootings rare in Thailand

Gun violence is not unheard of in Thailand. Firearms can be obtained legally, and many Thais own guns. Mass shootings are rare, though there are occasional gun battles in the far south of the country, where authorities have for years battled a long-running separatist insurgency.

The incident in Korat comes just a month after another high-profile mall shooting, in the central Thai city of Lopburi. In that case, a masked gunman carrying a handgun with a silencer killed three people, including a 2-year-old boy, and wounded four others as he robbed a jewelry store. A suspect, a school director, was arrested less than two weeks later and reportedly confessed, saying he did not mean to shoot anyone.

Source: Voice of America

Thai Gunman Shot Dead in Mall; 26 Killed, 57 Hurt in Rampage

NAKHON RATCHASIMA, THAILAND – A soldier with a grudge gunned down 26 people and wounded 57 in Thailand’s worst shooting spree before he was fatally shot inside a mall in the country’s northeast Sunday, officials said.

Officials said the soldier was angry over a financial dispute, first killing two people on a military base and then went on a far bloodier rampage Saturday, shooting as he drove to the mall where shoppers fled in terror.

It took police sharpshooters 16 hours to end the crisis.

Authorities said Sgt. Maj. Jakrapanth Thomma was behind the attack in Nakhon Ratchasima, a hub for Thailand’s relatively poorer and rural northeastern region. Much of the shooting took place at Terminal 21 Korat, an airport-themed mall filled with colorful Lego sculptures, a merry-go-round and huge replicas of landmarks from around the world.

This incident was unprecedented in Thailand, Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha told reporters as he gave the final tally Sunday morning after visiting the wounded in hospitals.

I hope this is the only one and the last incident, and that it never happens again. No one wants this to happen. It could be because of this person’s mental health in this particular moment, he said.

Prayuth said he was worried that people inside the mall could be accidentally hit by bullets fired by police, but added, I have checked, that didn’t happen.

Video taken outside the mall showed people diving for cover as shots rang out midafternoon Saturday. Many were killed outside the mall, some in cars, others while walking.

People flee in terror

Nattaya Nganiem and her family had just finished eating and were driving away when she heard gunfire.

“First I saw a woman run out from the mall hysterically,” said Nattaya, who shot video of the scene on her phone. “Then a motorcycle rider in front of her just ran and left his motorcycle there.”

Hundreds of people were evacuated from the mall in small batches by police while they searched for the gunman.

“We were scared and ran to hide in toilets,” said Sumana Jeerawattanasuk, one of those rescued by police. She said seven or eight people hid in the same room as her.

“I am so glad. I was so scared of getting hurt,” she said.

Shortly before midnight, police announced they had secured the above-ground portion of the mall, but were still searching for the shooter. About 16 hours later, officials held a news conference outside the mall to announce the gunman was fatally shot.

The officials did not release any details.

First victim: commanding officer

Defense Ministry spokesman Kongcheep told Thai media that the first person killed was the commanding officer of the 22nd Ammunition Battalion, in which the suspect also served. He said the gunman had fired at others at his base and took guns and ammunition before fleeing in an army Humvee.

City and neighborhood police officers, who asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to release information, said the man fired shots as he drove to the mall. Thai Rath television aired mall security camera footage showing a man with what appeared to be an assault rifle.

The man also posted updates to his Facebook page during the rampage.

“No one can escape death,” read one post. Another asked, “Should I give up?” In a later post, he wrote, “I have stopped already.”

A photo circulated on social media that appeared to be taken from the Facebook page shows a man wearing a green camouflaged military helmet while a fireball and black smoke rage behind him. Jakrapanth’s profile picture shows him in a mask and dressed in military-style fatigues and armed with a pistol. The background image is of a handgun and bullets. The Facebook page was made inaccessible after the shooting began.

Airport-theme mall

Mall Terminal 21 Korat, a multilevel glass and steel mall is designed to resemble an airport terminal, complete with a mock control tower and departure gates. A large model passenger jet dangles from wires beside one of the main escalators.

Each of its seven retail floors is decorated to represent a different country. A giant replica of Paris’ Eiffel Tower soars to the ceiling, while a model of London’s Big Ben dominates another area, and a massive model of California’s Golden Gate Bridge spans an open courtyard. A two-story golden Oscar statue towers over a food court.

Many malls in Thailand, including Terminal 21’s namesake in Bangkok, have metal detectors and security cameras at entrances manned by uniformed but unarmed security guards. Checks on those entering are often cursory at best.

Mass shootings rare in Thailand

Gun violence is not unheard of in Thailand. Firearms can be obtained legally, and many Thais own guns. Mass shootings are rare, though there are occasional gun battles in the far south of the country, where authorities have for years battled a long-running separatist insurgency.

The incident in Korat comes just a month after another high-profile mall shooting, in the central Thai city of Lopburi. In that case, a masked gunman carrying a handgun with a silencer killed three people, including a 2-year-old boy, and wounded four others as he robbed a jewelry store. A suspect, a school director, was arrested less than two weeks later and reportedly confessed, saying he did not mean to shoot anyone.

Source: Voice of America

Myanmar Returns to China a Wuhan Woman Who Crossed Border

YANGON, MYANMAR – Myanmar police have apprehended and returned to Chinese authorities one of five people from the city of Wuhan, center of the deadly, fast-spreading coronavirus, who slipped across the porous border between the two nations earlier this week.

The only woman in the group tested negative for the virus and was repatriated on Thursday. No information is available regarding what happened to her upon arriving in China. Her compatriots remain at large, according to police in Myanmar.

Her return came a day after police in the border town of Ruili in Yunnan Province notified the chief of police in Myanmar’s Muse District to be on the lookout for four men and a woman more than likely [carrying] the new coronavirus pneumonia, according to a letter dated February 5, and obtained by VOA Burmese.

On Friday, a Muse police officer, who did not want to be named, told VOA, We are still in pursuit of four missing Chinese. Yesterday, we looked for those five missing Chinese soon after we received notification and found one woman in Muse. After health workers from both our side and Chinese side checked, she was found to be in good health. We handed over her to the Chinese police yesterday.

Dr. Tin Maung Nyunt, chief of the local public health department, told VOA, We will inspect the places, wherever those missing Chinese might have stayed in Muse and whoever might have contacted with them will be checked. Our department alerted all health workers to be prepared to follow instructions.

In their letter, Ruili police requested that Muse police find out the whereabouts of the five Chinese citizens as soon as possible, control them in time and inform us of the situation. In the process of searching, pay attention to self-protection to avoid virus infection.

The two jurisdictions often coordinate as members of the China-Myanmar Joint Anti-Trafficking task force to combat what Human Rights Watch calls the booming business of transporting hundreds of women and girls from northern Myanmar to China and sell them to Chinese families struggling to find brides for their sons due to the country’s gender imbalance.

Ruili police provided their counterparts in Myanmar with detailed information about the five, including photos, ID numbers and addresses.

The men were all frequent visitors to Muse, according to Ruili police, who told Muse police the woman had visited Ruili Kaunglar jetty recently.

Dr. Khin Khin Gyi, deputy director of Myanmar’s (Central) Contagious Disease Prevention and Eradication Sub-Department, told VOA there are two suspected coronavirus cases and four people being monitored. All are being tended to according to WHO guidelines, she said.

Source: Voice of America