Daily Archives: August 6, 2019

The Art of Science: Olympus Launches the First Global Image of the Year Award

Prizes to be awarded to top global and regional submissions

WALTHAM, Mass., Aug. 06, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Inspired by the beauty and breadth of images submitted for the 2018 Image of the Year Life Science Light Microscopy Award held in Europe, Olympus has launched its first Global Image of the Year Life Science Light Microscopy Award, recognizing the best in life science imaging worldwide. Participants can win a CX43 microscope with a DP27 digital camera, X Line objectives, or an OM-D E-M5 Mark II camera.

Those interested in participating can enter through Jan. 31, 2020 by uploading images at Olympus-LifeScience.com/IOTY. Winners will be selected by a jury panel and announced in March 2020.

The jury consists of global representatives from both science and the arts, including photographer Ron Caplain; Geoff Williams, a bioimaging facility manager at Brown University; Urs Ziegler, the head of a microscopy imaging facility at the University of Zurich; Stefan Terjung, the operational manager of an advanced light microscopy facility at EMBL Heidelberg; Hiroaki Misono, a graduate school professor of brain science at Doshisha University; Zhu Xueliang, a professor at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yalin Wang, Director of Biomedical Research Core Facilities at Westlake University, Hangzhou, China; and Wendy Salmon, a light microscopy specialist of a bioimaging facility at MIT.

Participants may upload up to three microscopy images, accompanied by a brief explanation of the equipment used. All entries will be evaluated based on artistic and visual aspects, scientific impact, and microscope proficiency. Regional prizes in Asia, Europe, and the Americas will be awarded in addition to the global prize.

The Image of the Year European Life Science Light Microscopy Award began in 2017 to celebrate both the artistic and scientific value of microscopy images. Now on a global scale, the competition aims to encourage people to look at scientific images in a new way, appreciate their beauty, and share images with others.

More information about the Global Image of the Year Life Science Light Microscopy Award, including jury members’ biographies, last year’s winning images, and the full terms and conditions, can be found at Olympus-LifeScience.com/IOTY.

Olympus is a registered trademark and X Line is a trademark of Olympus Corporation.

Media Contact:
Kristin Schaeffer
(610) 973-2400
kristin@klunkmillan.com

PaybyPhone Announces Yuru Wang As Vice President Of Software Development

VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Aug. 06, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — PayByPhone, the global leader in mobile parking payments, today announced that Yuru Wang has been named Vice President of Software Development.  An experienced technology and software development leader, Wang joins PayByPhone from SAP, where he was Vice President of Engineering.  In his new position, Wang will oversee software development for PayByPhone’s global operations.

“PayByPhone is on an exciting growth trajectory, and Yuru Wang will be a fantastic addition to help achieve that growth,” said Andy Gruber, PayByPhone’s CEO.  “Yuru brings a wealth of experience in software development and in scaling companies quickly.  His experience will be vital as we continue to innovate as an organization, launching industry-leading solutions to make people’s journeys easier.”

Yuru brings with him over two decades of experience in software development and holds a master’s in computer science from the University of Saskatchewan.  He has a proven track record of building and scaling successful technology teams and while navigating through fast organizational growth.  In addition to leading the software development strategy for PayByPhone, Wang will be responsible for overseeing the expansion of the technology and information teams.

“I’m thrilled to be joining the company during such an exciting time of growth,” said Wang.  “PayByPhone is at an energizing point in their journey with seemingly limitless potential in front of them. I look forward to building great products together and delivering innovative solutions to mobility.”

About PayByPhone

PayByPhone is one of the fastest growing mobile payment companies in the world, processing over 100 million transactions totaling more than $400 million USD in payments annually. Through the company’s mobile web, smartphone and smartwatch applications, PayByPhone helps millions of consumers easily and securely pay for parking without the hassles of waiting in line, having to carry change or risking costly fines. A subsidiary of Volkswagen Financial Services AG, PayByPhone is leading the way in the creation of the mobile future.

Media Contact
Erica England
Director of Media Relations, Arketi Group
eengland@arketi.com

GSK Grants Exclusive Technology License for Clinical-Stage Ebola Vaccines to Sabin Vaccine Institute

 Transfer from GSK and partnership with NIAID will enable Sabin to advance development of the candidate vaccines

LONDON and WASHINGTON, Aug. 06, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — GSK and the Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) today announced exclusive agreements for Sabin to advance the development of the prophylactic candidate vaccines against the deadly Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and the closely related, but lesser known, Marburg virus. No licensed vaccines against these three viruses are currently available. All three cause hemorrhagic fever with subsequent death in an average of 50 percent of cases.1,2 More than 1,600 people have already died during the ongoing Ebola Zaire outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC),3 leading the World Health Organization (WHO) to recently declare it a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.4

Under the agreements between GSK and Sabin, Sabin has exclusively licensed the technology for all three candidate vaccines and acquired certain patent rights specific to these vaccines. The three candidate vaccines were initially developed collaboratively by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and Okairos, which was acquired by GSK in 2013. The candidate vaccines, based on GSK’s proprietary ChAd3 platform, were further developed by GSK, including the Phase II development for the Ebola Zaire vaccine.

Sabin Chief Executive Officer Amy Finan commented, “As an organization committed to improving lives through immunization, Sabin is dedicated to preventing devastating outbreaks of the Ebola and Marburg viruses. Thanks to GSK’s longstanding engagement in global health, as well as its scientific expertise, the ChAd3 vaccine program is well positioned to be an effective weapon in the global community’s arsenal against Ebola. Sabin appreciates GSK’s years of work to advance the ChAd3 Ebola program and the productive partnership the two organizations have established. Sabin plans to continue the development and seek regulatory approval of Ebola and Marburg vaccines with our shared goal of making them available to the millions of people potentially at risk.”

Thomas Breuer, Chief Medical Officer of GSK Vaccines, said: “These agreements with the Sabin Vaccine Institute are an important next step in the fight against Ebola and Marburg viruses. Enabling Sabin to build on the scientific progress GSK has delivered up to Phase II increases the likelihood these candidate vaccines may help prevent potential future outbreaks, and exemplifies GSK’s approach to global health vaccines which supports partners in taking forward our innovations in a sustainable way. I am proud of the work that our world-leading vaccines scientists at GSK have contributed so far to the development of these vaccine candidates, including the Ebola Zaire candidate vaccine which has demonstrated encouraging results in studies to date.”

To further develop the ChAd3 Ebola and Marburg vaccines, Sabin has entered into a Research Collaboration Agreement with the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The ChAd3-based vaccines against Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan, and Marburg viruses have demonstrated a strong safety profile and encouraging immunogenicity results after being administered to more than 5,000 adults and 600 children, in 13 different clinical trials to date.

Specifically, the majority of the clinical volunteers were tested using the ChAd3 Ebola Zaire vaccine. In addition to numerous Phase I trials, the Ebola Zaire vaccine has been tested in three Phase II trials in Africa; two trials were conducted by GSK and one was conducted by the Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia (PREVAIL), a clinical research partnership between NIAID and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola Sudan vaccine has been evaluated in three Phase I trials in Africa and the United States as a bivalent formulation with Ebola Zaire and will be evaluated in an upcoming Phase I study as monovalent formulation. A Phase I study of the Marburg vaccine is ongoing in the United States.

About the Sabin Vaccine Institute
The Sabin Vaccine Institute, a non-profit organization founded in 1993, is a leading advocate for expanding vaccine access and uptake globally, advancing vaccine research and development, and amplifying vaccine knowledge and innovation. Sabin’s R&D strategy focuses on continuing the development of candidate vaccines that have demonstrated early scientific value and target disease primarily impacting the world’s most vulnerable populations, but have little commercial value. The Blavatnik Family Foundation and the David E.I. Pyott Foundation provided seed funding to launch Sabin’s ChAd3 Ebola program. In past years, Sabin received more than $110 million for vaccine R&D programs from public and philanthropic funding sources, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, European Commission, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Global Health Innovative Technology Fund and the Michelson Medical Research Foundation.

Unlocking the potential of vaccines through partnership, Sabin has built a robust ecosystem of funders, innovators, implementers, practitioners, policy makers and public stakeholders to advance its vision of a future free from preventable diseases. Sabin is committed to finding solutions that last and extending the full benefits of vaccines to all people, regardless of who they are or where they live. At Sabin, we believe in the power of vaccines to change the world. For more information, visit www.sabin.org and follow us on Twitter, @SabinVaccine.

About GSK
GSK – a science-led global healthcare company with a special purpose: to help people do more, feel better, live longer. GSK is the world’s leading vaccine company, with a portfolio that helps protect people throughout life and an innovative pipeline of 16 vaccines in development. Our vaccines help prevent illnesses such as hepatitis A and B, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, pneumococcal disease, influenza, rotavirus, shingles and meningitis. At GSK, more than 17,000 people worldwide deliver around two million vaccine doses per day to people in 158 countries. For further information, please visit www.gsk.com.

About Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and Marburg
Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and Marburg are members of the Filoviridae virus family and are commonly referred to as filoviruses. All can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. No therapeutic treatment of the hemorrhagic fevers caused by filoviruses has been licensed to date.

The 2014-2016 outbreak in West Africa, the largest Ebola outbreak in history, was caused by Ebola Zaire, starting in Guinea and then moving across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia. The outbreak eventually spread to 10 countries and took the lives of more than 11,000 people. The ongoing 2018-2019 outbreak in eastern DRC is also caused by Ebola Zaire and has claimed the lives of more than 1,600 people. The outbreak has been further complicated by significant security issues adversely affecting public health response activities, and on July 17, WHO declared it a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

Marburg and Ebola viruses are transmitted to humans by infected animals, particularly fruit bats. Once a human is infected, the virus can spread to others through close personal contact or contact with bodily fluids. Isolation of infected people is currently the centerpiece of filovirus control.

Marburg was the first filovirus to be recognized in 1967 when a number of laboratory workers, including some in Marburg, Germany, developed hemorrhagic fever. Ebola was identified in 1976 when two simultaneous outbreaks occurred in northern Zaire (now the DRC) in a village near the Ebola River and southern Sudan. The outbreaks involved what eventually proved to be two different species of Ebola virus; both were named after the nations in which they were discovered.

GSK enquiries:   
UK Media enquiries:Simon Steel+44 (0) 20 8047 5502(London)
 Simon Moore+44 (0) 20 8047 5502(London)
    
US Media enquiries:Evan Berland+1 215 751 5497(Philadelphia)
 Sean Clements+1-215-751-3565(Philadelphia)
  
Analyst/Investor enquiries:Sarah Elton-Farr+44 (0) 208 047 5194(London)
 Danielle Smith+44 (0) 20 8047 7562(London)
 James Dodwell+44 (0) 20 8047 2406(London)
 Jeff McLaughlin+1 215 751 7002(Philadelphia)
    
Sabin Vaccine InstituteMatthew Fitzgerald+1 617 939 8314(Washington DC)
Cautionary statement regarding forward-looking statements
GSK cautions investors that any forward-looking statements or projections made by GSK, including those made in this announcement, are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those projected. Such factors include, but are not limited to, those described under Item 3.D ‘Principal risks and uncertainties’ in the company’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for 2018.
Registered in England & Wales:
No. 3888792
Registered Office:
980 Great West Road
Brentford, Middlesex
TW8 9GS

1 WHO fact sheet, Ebola virus disease, accessed 30 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ebola-virus-disease

2 WHO fact sheet, Marburg virus disease, accessed 30 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ebola-virus-disease

3 WHO, Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo – Health Emergency Update, accessed 30 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/ebola/drc-2019

4 WHO press release, Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, 17 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/17-07-2019-ebola-outbreak-in-the-democratic-republic-of-the-congo-declared-a-public-health-emergency-of-international-concern

Seoul National University Hospital and Syapse Sign Multi-Year Renewal Agreement to Expand Access to Precision Medicine in South Korea

Syapse and SNUH will work together to build Asia’s first learning health network of real-world data derived from the region’s leading precision oncology hospitals

Co-hosted symposium of East Asian hospitals will share best practices and strategies to accelerate precision medicine adoption in the region

SAN FRANCISCO and SEOUL, South Korea, Aug. 06, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Syapse, a company accelerating precision medicine through insights derived from its global health system network, and Seoul National University Hospital (SNUH), the premier hospital in South Korea, today announced that they have extended their partnership with a new multi-year agreement. As part of their partnership, SNUH and Syapse will collaboratively work towards building South Korea’s first real-world data sharing network for leading precision oncology hospitals in the region.

“We are very pleased to enter into this expanded multi-year agreement with Syapse focused on accelerating the practice of precision medicine,” said Kyung Hwan Kim, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Information Officer at Seoul National University Hospital. “We are proud of the progress we have made together and look forward to continuing our efforts with Syapse to develop the leading precision medicine platform in South Korea and the Asia Pacific region.”

As the leading cancer hospital in South Korea, SNUH has built a global reputation for innovative approaches to cancer care. SNUH serves more than 8,000 cancer patients per year across 16 Cancer Specialty Centers, 10 Multidisciplinary Cancer Treatment Centers, and a Cancer Clinical Trials Center. The Syapse and SNUH collaboration, established in January 2018, has focused on scaling the delivery of precision medicine insights through the integration and curation of clinical, molecular testing and outcomes data collected in information systems including electronic health records (EHRs).

“As a pioneer in cancer care and technology, SNUH is an important global leader in precision medicine and we are honored to expand our collaboration focused on delivering better outcomes for cancer patients in South Korea,” said Ken Tarkoff, CEO, Syapse. “Together we will work to build a precision medicine data sharing network in the region that will provide the high-quality real-world data and insights required to support hospitals in delivering the most informed personalized care to every cancer patient.”

SNUH and Syapse have also announced today that they will co-host the Syapse Precision Medicine Council Asia with support from MegazoneCloud. The inaugural invitation-only symposium for Syapse partners will be held at SNUH in Seoul on November 22 and 23, 2019 and convene clinical and executive healthcare leaders who are dedicated to advancing precision oncology. The Precision Medicine Council is focused on three primary goals: sharing best practices in growing precision medicine programs, generating actionable insights to advance the industry as a whole, and building upon current data-sharing initiatives.

“We are pleased to partner with Syapse to co-host the inaugural Precision Medicine Council Asia and look forward to welcoming our esteemed colleagues from across the region to South Korea. Together, we will provide the leadership necessary to support hospitals across East Asia in building world-class precision medicine programs,” added Dr. Kim.

About Seoul National University Hospital
Seoul National University Hospital has been leading the development of medicine and safeguarding public health in Korea over the past 100 years. It was established in 1885 as Korea’s first national hospital under the name Je Jung Won. Later, it became the affiliate hospital for Seoul National University College of Medicine before being recognized as a special corporate body under the name of Seoul National University Hospital. Today, the hospital is a world class center comprised of the Main Hospital, the Children’s Hospital, the Cancer Hospital and the Biomedical Research Institute. With over 1,700 hospital beds, approximately 2,000 inpatients and 8,000 outpatients are treated each day by 533 medical professors and 5,800 staff. Seoul National University Hospital’s vision for the 21st century is based on patient-oriented care, respect for humankind, the creation of knowledge and public service.

About Syapse
Syapse is on a mission to deliver the best care for every cancer patient through precision medicine. Our insights platform, data sharing network, and industry partnerships enable healthcare providers to bring precision cancer care to every patient who needs it. By bringing together leading healthcare innovators into a unified ecosystem, we have built one of the world’s largest learning health networks of provider-driven precision medicine data. In collaboration with our partners — including Advocate Aurora Health Care, CommonSpirit Health, Henry Ford Health System, Providence St. Joseph Health, and Seoul National University Hospital — we are working toward a future in which all cancer patients have access to the best personalized care.

About MegazoneCloud
MegazoneCloud is a cloud-specialized IT company providing end-to-end cloud services from infrastructure, platform, application and data services. MegazoneCloud is the first Premier Consulting Partner of Amazon Web Services in Korea as well as the number one AWS partner in Asia. MegazoneCloud is a business partner of Syapse in Korea providing cloud data services to the healthcare industry.

Media Contact
Colin Sanford for Syapse at colin.sanford@syapse.com

GSK Grants Exclusive Technology License for Clinical-Stage Ebola Vaccines to Sabin Vaccine Institute

 Transfer from GSK and partnership with NIAID will enable Sabin to advance development of the candidate vaccines

LONDON and WASHINGTON, Aug. 06, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — GSK and the Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) today announced exclusive agreements for Sabin to advance the development of the prophylactic candidate vaccines against the deadly Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and the closely related, but lesser known, Marburg virus. No licensed vaccines against these three viruses are currently available. All three cause hemorrhagic fever with subsequent death in an average of 50 percent of cases.1,2 More than 1,600 people have already died during the ongoing Ebola Zaire outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC),3 leading the World Health Organization (WHO) to recently declare it a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.4

Under the agreements between GSK and Sabin, Sabin has exclusively licensed the technology for all three candidate vaccines and acquired certain patent rights specific to these vaccines. The three candidate vaccines were initially developed collaboratively by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and Okairos, which was acquired by GSK in 2013. The candidate vaccines, based on GSK’s proprietary ChAd3 platform, were further developed by GSK, including the Phase II development for the Ebola Zaire vaccine.

Sabin Chief Executive Officer Amy Finan commented, “As an organization committed to improving lives through immunization, Sabin is dedicated to preventing devastating outbreaks of the Ebola and Marburg viruses. Thanks to GSK’s longstanding engagement in global health, as well as its scientific expertise, the ChAd3 vaccine program is well positioned to be an effective weapon in the global community’s arsenal against Ebola. Sabin appreciates GSK’s years of work to advance the ChAd3 Ebola program and the productive partnership the two organizations have established. Sabin plans to continue the development and seek regulatory approval of Ebola and Marburg vaccines with our shared goal of making them available to the millions of people potentially at risk.”

Thomas Breuer, Chief Medical Officer of GSK Vaccines, said: “These agreements with the Sabin Vaccine Institute are an important next step in the fight against Ebola and Marburg viruses. Enabling Sabin to build on the scientific progress GSK has delivered up to Phase II increases the likelihood these candidate vaccines may help prevent potential future outbreaks, and exemplifies GSK’s approach to global health vaccines which supports partners in taking forward our innovations in a sustainable way. I am proud of the work that our world-leading vaccines scientists at GSK have contributed so far to the development of these vaccine candidates, including the Ebola Zaire candidate vaccine which has demonstrated encouraging results in studies to date.”

To further develop the ChAd3 Ebola and Marburg vaccines, Sabin has entered into a Research Collaboration Agreement with the Vaccine Research Center (VRC) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The ChAd3-based vaccines against Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan, and Marburg viruses have demonstrated a strong safety profile and encouraging immunogenicity results after being administered to more than 5,000 adults and 600 children, in 13 different clinical trials to date.

Specifically, the majority of the clinical volunteers were tested using the ChAd3 Ebola Zaire vaccine. In addition to numerous Phase I trials, the Ebola Zaire vaccine has been tested in three Phase II trials in Africa; two trials were conducted by GSK and one was conducted by the Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia (PREVAIL), a clinical research partnership between NIAID and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola Sudan vaccine has been evaluated in three Phase I trials in Africa and the United States as a bivalent formulation with Ebola Zaire and will be evaluated in an upcoming Phase I study as monovalent formulation. A Phase I study of the Marburg vaccine is ongoing in the United States.

About the Sabin Vaccine Institute
The Sabin Vaccine Institute, a non-profit organization founded in 1993, is a leading advocate for expanding vaccine access and uptake globally, advancing vaccine research and development, and amplifying vaccine knowledge and innovation. Sabin’s R&D strategy focuses on continuing the development of candidate vaccines that have demonstrated early scientific value and target disease primarily impacting the world’s most vulnerable populations, but have little commercial value. The Blavatnik Family Foundation and the David E.I. Pyott Foundation provided seed funding to launch Sabin’s ChAd3 Ebola program. In past years, Sabin received more than $110 million for vaccine R&D programs from public and philanthropic funding sources, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, European Commission, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Global Health Innovative Technology Fund and the Michelson Medical Research Foundation.

Unlocking the potential of vaccines through partnership, Sabin has built a robust ecosystem of funders, innovators, implementers, practitioners, policy makers and public stakeholders to advance its vision of a future free from preventable diseases. Sabin is committed to finding solutions that last and extending the full benefits of vaccines to all people, regardless of who they are or where they live. At Sabin, we believe in the power of vaccines to change the world. For more information, visit www.sabin.org and follow us on Twitter, @SabinVaccine.

About GSK
GSK – a science-led global healthcare company with a special purpose: to help people do more, feel better, live longer. GSK is the world’s leading vaccine company, with a portfolio that helps protect people throughout life and an innovative pipeline of 16 vaccines in development. Our vaccines help prevent illnesses such as hepatitis A and B, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, measles, mumps, rubella, polio, pneumococcal disease, influenza, rotavirus, shingles and meningitis. At GSK, more than 17,000 people worldwide deliver around two million vaccine doses per day to people in 158 countries. For further information, please visit www.gsk.com.

About Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and Marburg
Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan and Marburg are members of the Filoviridae virus family and are commonly referred to as filoviruses. All can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. No therapeutic treatment of the hemorrhagic fevers caused by filoviruses has been licensed to date.

The 2014-2016 outbreak in West Africa, the largest Ebola outbreak in history, was caused by Ebola Zaire, starting in Guinea and then moving across land borders to Sierra Leone and Liberia. The outbreak eventually spread to 10 countries and took the lives of more than 11,000 people. The ongoing 2018-2019 outbreak in eastern DRC is also caused by Ebola Zaire and has claimed the lives of more than 1,600 people. The outbreak has been further complicated by significant security issues adversely affecting public health response activities, and on July 17, WHO declared it a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

Marburg and Ebola viruses are transmitted to humans by infected animals, particularly fruit bats. Once a human is infected, the virus can spread to others through close personal contact or contact with bodily fluids. Isolation of infected people is currently the centerpiece of filovirus control.

Marburg was the first filovirus to be recognized in 1967 when a number of laboratory workers, including some in Marburg, Germany, developed hemorrhagic fever. Ebola was identified in 1976 when two simultaneous outbreaks occurred in northern Zaire (now the DRC) in a village near the Ebola River and southern Sudan. The outbreaks involved what eventually proved to be two different species of Ebola virus; both were named after the nations in which they were discovered.

 

GSK enquiries:

UK Media enquiries: Simon Steel +44 (0) 20 8047 5502 (London)
Simon Moore +44 (0) 20 8047 5502 (London)
US Media enquiries: Evan Berland +1 215 751 5497 (Philadelphia)
Sean Clements +1-215-751-3565 (Philadelphia)
   
Analyst/Investor enquiries: Sarah Elton-Farr +44 (0) 208 047 5194 (London)
Danielle Smith +44 (0) 20 8047 7562 (London)
James Dodwell +44 (0) 20 8047 2406 (London)
Jeff McLaughlin +1 215 751 7002 (Philadelphia)
Sabin Vaccine Institute Matthew Fitzgerald +1 617 939 8314 (Washington DC)
Cautionary statement regarding forward-looking statements
GSK cautions investors that any forward-looking statements or projections made by GSK, including those made in this announcement, are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those projected. Such factors include, but are not limited to, those described under Item 3.D ‘Principal risks and uncertainties’ in the company’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for 2018.
Registered in England & Wales:
No. 3888792
 
Registered Office:
980 Great West Road
Brentford, Middlesex
TW8 9GS

1 WHO fact sheet, Ebola virus disease, accessed 30 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ebola-virus-disease

2 WHO fact sheet, Marburg virus disease, accessed 30 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/ebola-virus-disease

3 WHO, Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo – Health Emergency Update, accessed 30 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/ebola/drc-2019

4 WHO press release, Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, 17 July 2019 – available at: https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/17-07-2019-ebola-outbreak-in-the-democratic-republic-of-the-congo-declared-a-public-health-emergency-of-international-concern

MAS Issues New Rules to Strengthen Cyber Resilience of Financial Industry

Singapore, 6 August 2019 The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) today issued a set of legally binding requirements to raise the cyber security standards and strengthen cyber resilience of the financial sector. The Notice on Cyber Hygiene sets out the measures that financial institutions must take to mitigate the growing risk of cyber threats.

2 The Notice will make compulsory key elements in the existing MAS Technology Risk Management (TRM) Guidelines [1]. Specifically, it is mandatory for financial institutions to comply with the following requirements:

establish and implement robust security for IT systems;

ensure updates are applied to address system security flaws in a timely manner;

deploy security devices to restrict unauthorised network traffic;

implement measures to mitigate the risk of malware infection;

secure the use of system accounts with special privileges to prevent unauthorised access; and

strengthen user authentication for critical systems as well as systems used to access customer information.

3 Financial institutions have 12 months to put these measures in place before the requirements come into effect on 6 August 2020. Mr Tan Yeow Seng, Chief Cyber Security Officer, MAS, said, Cyber threats in the financial sector are growing as a result of an increased digital footprint and pervasive use of the Internet. The financial sector needs to remain vigilant and ensure that defences are able to counter varied and evolving threats. Good cyber hygiene can go a long way in protecting financial institutions from common types of cyber incursions. These fundamental and essential measures can be implemented by all financial institutions regardless of size or system complexity.

4 MAS had sought feedback from the public in September 2018 on the proposal to make this suite of cyber security measures into legally binding requirements. Financial institutions generally welcomed these measures and provided some suggestions regarding implementation of the requirements. These include:

a) focusing on strengthening user access to systems that store or access customer data; and

b) allowing more time [2] for financial institutions to design, acquire and integrate robust user authentication technology into their critical systems.

5 MAS has taken the industry’s feedback into consideration when finalising the Notice. The detailed response to the feedback received can be found on the MAS website . MAS thanks the public for their feedback.

***

1. [1] The TRM Guidelines are a set of best practices that provide financial institutions with guidance on the oversight of technology risk management, security practices and controls to address technology risks. MAS expects financial institutions to observe the guidelines as this will be taken into account in MAS’ risk assessment of the financial institutions.

1. [2] The additional six months will apply from 6 August 2020 that was set out in Para 3, if a financial institution implements measures to reduce the risks in the interim.

Source: Monetary Authority of Singapore

The Man Behind Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge ‘Died Easier Than the People He Killed’

SIEM REAP, CAMBODIA In his most recent photos, Nuon Chea looks like somebody’s grandfather, wearing big dark glasses that suggest a sensitivity to light possibly tied to other medical problems.

Not that long ago, he’d gone from tottering as he walked to using a wheelchair. There were whispers of liver problems and kidney troubles and whatever else happens as a human body passes through its ninth decade.

That longevity eluded some 1.7 million Cambodians who died between 1975 to 1979, as the Khmer Rouge tried, and failed, to turn Cambodia into a self-sufficient agrarian utopia. Nuon Chea, known as Brother No. 2, is widely believed to have been the mastermind behind the development of a Maoist society without money, religion or intellectuals envisioned by the regime’s founder, Pol Pot, who died in 1998.

Nuon Chea was appealing his Nov. 16, 2018, conviction for genocide when he died on Sunday in Khmer Soviet Friendship Hospital in Phnom Penh. He had been in care since July 2. At age 93, he was serving a life sentence for a 2014 conviction for crimes against humanity.

He died easier than the people he killed, said Sun Sitha, 58, a resident of Siem Reap who lost her father and three siblings to the Khmer Rouge. He separated people from their families, and hurt them. He deserved to die.

Silent as to actions

If Nuon Chea was the mastermind behind Cambodia’s genocide, the details died with him. He never spoke in court of how the Khmer Rouge executed their plan to achieve a new regime. He never admitted guilt. He maintained that the Khmer Rouge were nationalists, fighting Viet Nam, and the United States, which engaged secret bombings of Cambodia as it tracked the communist Viet Cong during the Vietnam War.

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen is a former Khmer Rouge fighter who has been in power since 1985. Hun Sen, the increasingly authoritarian leader of the ruling Cambodian People’s Party, has spoken out against reopening investigations into that era.

Liv Sovanna, one of Noun Chea’s lawyers, said at a Sunday press conference in Phnom Penh after Nuon Chea’s death that his client was innocent because when the defendant dies, the lawsuit is dissolved. Thus, the verdict issued by the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts in Cambodia (ECCC), the tribunal that tried Nuon Chea and other Khmer Rouge leaders, has no effect any longer because, based on the presumption of innocence, Nuon Chea is innocent.

The controversial ECCC convicted Khmer Rouge torture center chief, Kaing Guek Eav, also known as Comrade Duch in 2010 and found guilty Khmer Rouge leader Khieu Samphan in 2014. In 2018, just as with Nuon Chea, they were sentenced to life imprisonment for crimes against humanity and genocide. Two other top suspects � Ieng Sary and Ieng Thirith � died before their cases could be concluded.

Cambodia is a young country. Only about 10% of the population are, like Sun Sitha, in their 50s or older. Half its 16.5 million people are under the age of 22. If their parents survived the Khmer Rouge, they rarely speak of their experiences because many Cambodians believe that would transmit the suffering to their children.

That means most Cambodians have no direct experience of the Khmer Rouge, who were known to execute teachers, doctors, ethnic Vietnamese, with pickaxes rather than spend money on bullets.

Knows history

Yuth Kunthea, a 25-year-old resident of Siem Reap, does know about Noun Chea and the Khmer Rouge.

I’m not sorry that he died because he caused the deaths of tens of thousands of people, he hurt people, and separated them from their family members, she said, adding she learned about the regime in school. We lost a lot of good Khmer people.

The Khmer Rouge buried the bodies in mass graves, dubbed killing fields, like the one near Trung Bat, in northern Cambodia, where the Khmer Rouge maintained a prison and a crematorium.

Many of the remains were ground down to make fertilizer in an effort to meet quotas for the rice crop. Others, like those found by soil excavators in 2012, were buried intact with arms bound behind them or weighed down by rocks, according to the Documentation Center of Cambodia(DC-CAM).

No one can forget him, said Lat Lon, a 73-year-old monk from Teputhyvong Temple, the site of a mass grave, in Siem Reap province. We have no peace of mind. They tortured people, so he deserved to die. People should have peace of mind.

According to Buddhist beliefs, even though Noun Chea and other Khmer Rouge leaders are dead, the souls of their victims and those who survived still do not have a peaceful mind.

How can they have peace of mind? Lat Lon asked. According to the Dharma, dead people still miss their family members.

‘He died with sin’

Youk Chhang, the DC-CAM executive director in Phnom Penh and a survivor of the Khmer Rouge regime, told VOA Khmer by phone that Nuon Chea cannot escape his deeds in death despite the law’s presumption of innocence.

He was born like all of us but he committed sins and he died with sin, he said.

Nuon Chea died without the dignity that comes with age, said Youk Chhang, and his death is drawing mixed reactions.

Some I asked immediately [after Nuon Chea died] said they are not happy because when he was alive, he was defiant about what he had done, Youk Chhang said. He did not give a value of the history to the next generation. Even after the verdict, he was still defiant for what he did and he was responsible.

Documentary filmmaker Thet Sambath interviewed Nuon Chea extensively in the late 1990s, and then co-produced the 2009 award-winning documentary “Enemies of the People,” about the Khmer Rouge leadership. Just after Nuon Chea’s death, Thet Sambath, who lives in Massachusetts, told VOA Khmer by phone that he was grateful to Nuon Chea for giving me historical documents and secret stories about the Khmer Rouge, he said. It’s very lucky for Cambodian people to have this information, he added.

Source: Voice of America